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20120925
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fighting a civil rights and virginia. we have a state where they want to go backward. the federal government can do a great job intervening in the delivery of recovery support services. meaning the federal dollars -- to me it would make sense to make them spend a small portion on recovery support services, to include housing. housing is a critical element in recovery. i guess my thought process goes -- somehow forced the state to discriminate against recovery, like they do in virginia, to spend some of the federal dollars on the offensive recovery support services. that is the nature of my thought process. by doing so, we can really reduce --, help recovery. to block out recovery people -- it is just insane to me. the state is not going to change. but the federal government if you just make a rule or regulation, you have got to spend a small amount of recovery and stop blowing it to agencies and virginia. i would be glad to elaborate after the press conference, of course. but that is the general thought and presidents. -- precedence. >> we have some programs that are specific arou
win and my retort is if you look back over the years, from women's suffrage, civil rights, to more recently the alternative ener movement, have been borne from third parties garn hing enough votes away from the two major political parties so engrained in the status quo that they never impose the sweeping changes so i hope you can comment on the role of third parties not necessarily in winning elections but in changing the agenda to the point where we get the changes we end up treasuring over the next century. host: thank you for the call. dr. jill stein. guest: thank you for making that point, which is very important. in fact, what so many people call progress in this country, whether you talk about women getting the right to vote, the abbitionist slavery, the protection of workers in the workplace, the right to organize, the 40 hour work week, child labor laws, social social security, the new deal, you name it, all of these have come out of independent third parties, because as you say, the party that is are bought and paid for by large corporations which are part of the status qu
presidents do. on civil rights, especially, there was a lot of movement from 1962, when the tapes start to 1963. it was all changing. the white house had swung very much behind the civil rights movement in the fall of 1963. >> he was very involved in the minut minutia, like our other boss, president clinton. >> exactly. incredible moment in august 28th, 1963, the great martin luther king speech "i have a dream" had just happened and they had a political strategy session where president kennedy went through all the members of the house and senate and what he thought their likelihood was to support civil rights. it was clear, he was on their side, driving it forward. >> there's a little clip that exposes a personal side of the president as well. let's play that. >> i wanted to do back to jordan marsh. >> all right, sir. i want that follow's incompetent who had his picture taken in next to mrs. kennedy's bed. he is a silly bastard. i wouldn't have him running a cat house. >> he is furious over a $5,000 bill for a hospital room, right? sn>> a timely expenditure built for a legitimate reason
enacted by the first congress. but it sat dormant for 170 odd years. then some civil rights type folks picked it up and human rights type folks and started bringing cases in which the plaintiff is foreign, the defendant is foreign, and the tort took place in some foreign place and they are bringing it to u.s. courts. so a paraguayan plaintiff and a pair of wayne defendant and it took place in her way. so the ticket to a u.s. -- a paraguayan plaintiff and a paraguayan defendant and it took place in paraguay. so they take it to the u.s. in this particular case, k iobal takes place in nigeria. and the nigerian government mistreated me, torture and so forth and these will companies, foreign oil companies, were complice it, helping the nigerian government do this to me. so i am wanting to sue the oil companies in federal court. and the oil companies defendants say that this does not apply to corporations. you cannot sue a corporation under this statute. that was their claim last year at the supreme court and the u.s. supreme court heard arguments in the case and did something very unusual.
know, he gets a lot of grief on civil rights. and it's true he did not use the bully pulpit. he could have done a better job on that. but he was a subtle guy. he desegregated d.c. when people weren't watching. he desegregated the armed services. it wasn't truman. he appointed all the federal judges that desegregated the south. he believed in moving, as john was saying, with a hidden hand. that's true on civil rights as well. he's been unfairly criticized for being weak on civil rights. he was not as strong as he could have been, but he did things behind the scenes that were important. >> let's talk, presidential historian, jon meacham, who has a book coming out after the election that's forthcoming. "thomas jefferson, t.j." ike, a good president? a near great president? or a great president? >> i would say he's great. i think that he -- one of the things we haven't talked about on the domestic side is he ratified what franklin roosevelt and harry truman had done in that he could have created -- in 1952, '53, the political climate, i think, and check me on this, evan, was such that if
versus board. i said i think this is the civil rights issue of our generation. the dividing line is not race or class, but around educational opportunity. if we're serious about closing the achievement gap, we have to close the opportunity gap. i do not think we have had anything near the sense of urgency and commitment to closing those gaps that we need to. to look at the staggering inequities and inequalities, we have to get better faster. all those things compel us to act. the president has provided leadership. he understands what is at stake. congress has been supportive. we have to work on this together and put politics and the ideology aside. we have to educate our way to a better economy. i talk about a cradle to career agenda. we have to start with early childhood education. i could make a compelling case that is the best investment we can make. if we can get our babies into kindergarten and ready to read, we start to close the gaps. if we do not do that, we're playing catch-up. we play catch up at every level of the education system. many of our colleges today, 50% of yo
and having been in charlotte, a great civil-rights city, where the students from the historical black college in 1960 set up a lunch counter in to grant them and yet, what do we see today? state after state, efforts to suppress voting rights instead of expanding them. not enough people vote in this country. in pennsylvania, there is legislation now on the books that could disenfranchise between 750,000-1 million people. president obama won by 600,000 boats in pennsylvania last time. this really does determine the election. i don't care who you are for. this will determine the election. it is a huge problem or the country. we should be celebrating voters going to the polls, not putting impediments in their way. host: the radio program " democracy now" turns 25 this year? guest: we started in 1996. we were just on radio. the week of september 11, 2001, we started on the first television station in new york city on public access. then it just caught on like wildfire. beyond the election and more television stations aired us and radio stations and npr stations and pbs stations all over the countr
hispanics. it is a civil rights group the advancement project that came out talking about the potential impact of all of the various efforts in particularly states where there is a big latino population. is that related to this voter i.d. or you know, what other forms, attempts of voter suppression. >> it is related to voter i.d. but we're seeing a lot of other techniques. so in florida, they made it very, very hard to do voter registration drives, the paperwork requirements were very ominous and it was a crime if you didn't comply with them. most organizations including the league of women voters decide they didn't want to play. that law was struck down by a federal court but it did a lot of damage while it was in effect. you're seeing attempts to take away people's ability to vote early so we've got -- took early voting starting in iowa in places like ohio and florida. you're seeing laws passed to reduce the number of states where early voting can happen. that does have an impact, like i said, minority voter
is cnn's deborah feyerick. >> reporter: it is a scene that played out in states across the country. civil rights groups pushing back against voter i.d. laws enacted by republican controlled legislatures since 2010. >> the effort to change the rules of the game at the last minute is a really misguided effort. >> reporter: wendy wiser is with the brandon center for justice and warns hundreds of thousands of voters may not have necessary i.d. they include the elderly, college students, poor people, blacks and latinos, groups that traditionally vote democratic. >> we need to do everything we can to ensure that there is no fraud in our elections, but what we shouldn't be doing is passing unnecessary laws that needlessly exclude thousands or hundreds of thousands of eligible americans from participating equally in our democracy. >> reporter: the new voter i.d. laws protect only against voter impersonation. in pennsylvania, a traditional swing state, lawyers for both sides admit no known cases of in person fraud. still, it is a problem says conservative columnist john fund, an expert on the subj
to debunk a false -- debunk false claims. i think "the weekly standard" would agree. when we look at civil rights, it should be not about the quality of results. -- it might reflect that there is a republican primary going on, or it might reflect the fact that they are feeling the same journalistic standards. -- they are failing the same journalistic standards. i think this varies over time. that is just a false logic. i do not know that it is 3 to 1, and i do not know the time you're talking about. some of that is republicans criticizing other republicans. it is certainly not three to one on our side. other questions? we have two here, if we can get the microphone over to the table in front of the cameras. i am keeping her hopping here. >> i am michael, and given what we have just heard about people choosing to believe their side or their candidate or their team of people that believe they are objective journalists, and i count myself among them, and i do not believe that many voters believe that being a liar is a disqualifying traits. what are you guys seeing? what can happen on the grou
. i analyzed the situation to determine where it needed to be done and did the right thing. i think that that can happen. i think that by working together, that by being civil, you know, you have not seen any attack ads run by me. there have been attack ads run in this campaign, but not endorsed by me. i think that by partisanship is called for and can be accomplished, and i will work to do that. [applause] >> mr. plummer? >> absolutely. what i said i and my opening statements was true. the voters are hurting. they do not care if they are -- if you are republican or democrat. our farmers are struggling through one of the worst seasons they have ever seen. i announced this week that i would call for a discharge petition against leadership because they need a farm bill. there are some very serious policy issues out there now. is this right for southern illinois? there are a lot of issues that are not. obama care is bad. cap and trade is bad. the dream act is bad. i will not stand up for those issues, pushed by republican or democrat. the fact that the farm bill is not happening right
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)